Hung Gar

Hung Gar

Hung Gar Kung Fu started when the burning of all the Shaolin Temples were complete. The emperor fearing for his life outlawed martial arts and weapons. An Abott and a few monks/disciples did escape, and started training in secret. Their main goal was to restore the Ming Dynasty. This style incorporates the Five Elements of Metal, Wood, Water, Fire, and Earth; along with the five natural movements of the Dragon, Snake, Tiger, Leopard, and Crane. Hung Gar Kung Fu features short, medium, and long range defensive and offensive techniques using circular and center line theories. It develops: coordination of the hands and feet; powerful punches & kicks, with the emphasis on deep solid stances, simultaneous blocks & strikes and hard rigorous training. Reknown and feared for their heavy blocks, others would think twice before attacking a student of Hung Gar. Basics of this style all orginates from the Shoalin Temple.

Hung Gar (English translation) is also known as "Hung Keun" (Hung style/set) or "Hung Ga Keun" (Hung family style) is one of the more popular styles of Chinese Kung Fu. Many of China's legendary heroes studied Hung Gar, such as Wong Fei Hung, Fong Sai Yuk, Tang Fung, and Lam Tsai Wing all contributing many forms to this style. Some of the forms include Lau ga, Fu Hok Sheong Yin (Tiger Crane), Gung Gee Fook Fu (Taming the Tiger), Mui Fa (Plum Blossom), Ng Ying (Five animals), Wu Deep Cheung (Butterfly Palm) and Sup Gee Keun (Ten pattern).

Si Tai Gung Wong Bo Tong  

Si Tai Gung Wong Bo Tong

The picture above is Sigung Stan's second Hung Gar Sifu, Wong Bo Tong. Sigung Stan also learned Hung Gar from Lam Fay Hung, Lau Jaam (Hong Kong), and from another Sifu Lee from his home village in China, where Sigung Stan was born.

Si Gung Stan Lee  

Si Gung Stan Lee